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  • Ship
    replied
    My tanks came with intakes installed.? I know some have a removable intake. Not sure which years.

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  • Capjohnson.mike
    replied
    What fuel pick ups have yall had good luck with? Moeller?

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  • Ship
    replied
    The tyvek is supposed to wick moisture and allow it to pass. Time will tell.

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  • SUBH2OHNTR
    replied
    I put 2 coats of coal tar epoxy top and bottom and 4 coats on sides that will contact the foam. I used high density rubber and made pads for the tank to sit on so it was level in the hole. I glued these pads to the bottom of the tank with 4200 I also put a few pads on the stringer side of the tank to hold it off the stringer. I then used 2” backer rod’s and pushed them into the gaps around the tank (these fit very tight) to keep the foam from running under tank. Then I poured my foam. None ended up beneath the tank and because there is no foam on the stringer side of the tank and it has a little pitch toward the stringer any water that makes it’s way into the compartment will naturally flow between the tank and stringer and out the drain holes. I know the tyvek bag method has been discussed here for years but what I don’t like is that the bag won’t stick to the tank and that will allow water to sit between the bag and tank causing corrosion. The foam I use sticks to the coal tar epoxy so there isn’t a void for water to sit.
    Last edited by SUBH2OHNTR; 01-09-2023, 07:29 AM.

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  • Quik Fix
    replied
    Quik Fix basic rule. Water WILL get in, give it a way out. Coal Tar Epoxy definitely.

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  • Ship
    replied
    Alum like stainless creates a protective layer of oxidation. Water laying nest to the raw metal allows electrolysis. The coal tar epoxy is the best protection at this point. The next is keep it as dry as possible and allow air around the tank. That said my tanks lasted from 1982 to 2008. Not bad and that was with the foam in contact with the metal. In fact the corrosion was where the foam separated from the tank and the water was laying next to the metal.

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  • Damon
    replied
    Multiple coats of two-part coal tar epoxy, then easy on the foam. Don’t need much of it. Did not pour any in the corner near the weep hole.

    I do like Quik Fix’s approach, and will likely do it that way in the future.

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  • Quik Fix
    replied
    Strips under the tanks and wooden wedges to hold them in place. NO FOAM.

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  • Ship
    replied
    I used tyvek bags to foam into so the foam didn't roam to unwanted locations.

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  • radioman
    replied
    When we put our tanks in, we cut wide strips of HDPE material (cutting board) and laid under the tanks for space for the water to run toward the drains.
    We also used 1/2" rope coated in Vaseline and left it protrude through the drain holes, after the foam cured we pulled the ropes out to make sure the drains were clear.

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  • Capjohnson.mike
    replied
    Quick question for installation gang. So when i drop these in and refoam. What do you guys do to prevent the drains from being clogged? Do you shove a dowell or pvc in the drain until after you pour and then when the foam is set pull it? Can i wrap the pvc in wax paper so it doesnt adhere to the foam as easily? Just brainstorming while im at work

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  • Ship
    replied
    .090 is what the old spec was. I like the new standard of . 125 epoxy coated.

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  • Capjohnson.mike
    started a topic New fuel tanks

    New fuel tanks

    Need new fuel tanks got the old ones out, Ill measure to check what I have, but what size tanks do yall have luck with. 3/16 aluminum?
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