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Old Holes and Water Saturation

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  • Old Holes and Water Saturation

    I finally removed the old POS captain’s chair and pedestal from the deck and install a custom hinged folding chair (separate post). It left 6 good sized holes and lots water trapped inside the enclosed compartment. How would you all deal with this?

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    1990 Shamrock Mackinaw
    Mercruiser 383 Stroker MPI
    VD 72C 1.91:1/ACME 17x15.5 w/.075 cup 4B

  • #2
    Cut out for the appropriately sized deck hatch and start digging. Leaving the hatch open over time will help to dry as well.

    regards Holty

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    • #3
      Is the deck still solid in that spot? If it is then i may just try the vacuum method to suck as much moisture out as possible and then plug the holes with resin and use a dremel to put some swirls in it to get close to the non skid pattern ( i did that on my 26 to some holes and you have to know where to look to see them). If the area is soft or delaminating then i would break out the oscillating tool and start cutting the deck up like I did on mine (i am good at turning a small project into a large one).

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      • #4
        The deck is still solid in that area. How would I be able to fill the holes without being able to tape it from the bottom?

        I was initially thinking about doing a cutout to install a hatch, but started thinking twice about it. If I do go this route, I would want to make it a very clean job and go with a very good quality hatch, possibly an aluminum one. Some of the plastic ones can be a bit flimsy.
        Last edited by Damon; 03-25-2021, 10:16 AM.
        1990 Shamrock Mackinaw
        Mercruiser 383 Stroker MPI
        VD 72C 1.91:1/ACME 17x15.5 w/.075 cup 4B

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        • #5
          If you mixed some thickened resin to consistency of peanut butter (maybe thicker) with cabosil it would probably stay in the holes...if it sags then you can go back and top off if needed. Could maybe even top it off with some pigmented gel coat to try to match up the colors.
          Last edited by tcf25; 03-25-2021, 11:09 AM.

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          • #6
            After looking again I see some of those holes are close to 3/4" in diameter. I am a K.I.S.S believer so......After cleaning the holes and the surrounding area I would insert a good amount of 4200 into each hole. Then insert short stainless carriage bolts (1" or so) that have a head a touch bigger than the hole. I would want to see a little 4200 squeeze out so you may have to butter them up. Then clean it up with thinners. The slightly rounded head of the carriage bolts will look OK and not cause a trip hazard. PL500 could be used in lieu of the 4200 and would harden faster.

            regards Holty

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            • #7
              I vote with Holty. Simpliest.
              1988 26' cuddy
              1975 20' open
              16' Sandpiper
              14' Certified Fiberglass

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              • #8
                Ditto. I might drill the holes a little larger to be rid of any bacteria or mold which might want to nibble on the wood.
                Atlantic City, NJ
                1982 Cuddy, Rebuilt 351 .060 rings, Edelbrock carb

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                • #9
                  Most of us are okay with small gel coat repairs and pretty good at reading and following kit instructions, but inexperienced and intimidated when a surface deck really needs to be carefully temporarily cutout and later fiberglassed back in (with matching gel coat surface) to access, remove and clean out the rotten core, so new epoxy honey comb looking panels can be cut and fitted and filled with resin/epoxy to refill the void created by the absence of the original core (now wet nasty rotten material). It sure would be nice if some the pro's who have "been there done that and earned the t-shirt" would describe the procedures and techniques to actually make such repairs.

                  Just asking for a friend -

                  Several years ago I paid hundreds of dollars to a local pro to repair the rear deck panel on the 20' Open Fisherman with epoxied honey comb filler board material (maybe called coosa) after the original core rotted from water entering the core through 10-15 holes for the fasteners to support the great fuel tank (from Action Marine) required to replace the ethanol dissolved original fiberglass encapsulated fuel pod. Since the panel was removable the fiberglass pro could make the repairs from the underside saving the original non-skid deck surface making the panel solid as a rock.
                  Kingfisher
                  1990 22' PREDATOR INDMAR 5.7 310 HP and ZF 45 C
                  Fishineer
                  1976 20' OPEN FISHERMAN Ford 302 and B/W 1:1
                  Wilmington, NC

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                  • tcf25
                    tcf25 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I am far from an expert but check out my rebuild thread. There are too many different ways to fix stuff and best to do what you are most comfortable with.

                • #10
                  I would ream the holes round and drive resin coated dowels to just below the surface, then fill with gelcoat. After a few months, you won't even notice the repair.
                  Steve
                  1998 260 Mackinaw Sea Maxx 5.7 HO TBI 12' Klamath w/ 20hp Tohatsu EFI

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                  • #11
                    Originally posted by tuner View Post
                    I would ream the holes round and drive resin coated dowels to just below the surface, then fill with gelcoat. After a few months, you won't even notice the repair.
                    I like that .
                    1988 26' cuddy
                    1975 20' open
                    16' Sandpiper
                    14' Certified Fiberglass

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                    • #12
                      I was going to suggest you use a straw, but I see there are some better ideas here .....
                      1987 26' Hardtop
                      1996 20' Walkaround Cuddy

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